Growing up my idea of fatherhood was filled with lectures, life lessons, and camaraderie either through sports or hunting/fishing. That is of course, because that was a perfect description of my father. 

To this day, after 25 years, each of those aspects are still alive and very well. Lectures and life lessons are common occurrences during conversation with him. Both my mom and wife would tell you that a conversation not based on one of these characteristics is pretty hard to come by. But I've come to realize after all this time, that these conversations were always from the heart because as an individual we can never stop learning. And it only made me wish that I had listened a little more during my early teenage years when I wanted to sleep and play video games rather than work on the truck or dig a drainage ditch around the house for runoff water. Although, for the most part I did the work (not without complaint) and I'm glad that I did. I'd much rather rely on myself to do the work than pay someone else an arm and a leg to do it for me. Saving money and learning new trades whenever you can, another one of dad's life lessons.


Then there was my dad, the coach on the t-ball team and all the way through little league. Even throwing the ball in the front yard with me when I met him in the driveway with a glove the minute he got home from work every day. My biggest fan, next to my mom of course, at each of my sporting events from baseball to basketball and all the way down to my two years of tennis. Finding whatever chance he could to be at every one of my games, even when he was dog-tired from working the graveyard shift at the plant. Speaking of being dog-tired, he still found a way to take me hunting and fishing and to teach me about the great outdoors every chance he could. Granted I'm sure this great escape was just as much for him as it was finding a hobby that we could bond with. A bond, that allows me to hold the title of "I still caught the bigger fish", which he is reminded of each time he looks above the fireplace at the lake house. Don't worry dad one day you'll get there, but then I'll just catch a bigger one again!

So now here we are, 25 years old, and it's my first Father's Day with a son of my own. And although I was scared to death when I found out I would soon be a father, I knew I had a great teacher to fall back on when I needed help. Not to mention, Mason is going to have one heck of a time fishing and hunting with his PawPaw. He'll also get to learn all those same life lessons I learned growing up, twice over, since I'll be reiterating what PawPaw teaches him. In Mason's two short months he's already grown so much and learned so many new things. I hope that one day he has the same love for sports and the outdoors that I do, but regardless I hope he is able to find and do whatever makes him happy. I know that being there and putting forth the effort is the most important part of being a dad and my solemn swear is to always give him 110%.



So for my first Father's Day, instead of celebrating myself, I want to say thanks to my dad for all of the sacrifices he made for me and all the time he spent making sure I was ready for this day!


Growing up my idea of fatherhood was filled with lectures, life lessons, and camaraderie either through sports or hunting/fishing. That is of course, because that was a perfect description of my father. 

To this day, after 25 years, each of those aspects are still alive and very well. Lectures and life lessons are common occurrences during conversation with him. Both my mom and wife would tell you that a conversation not based on one of these characteristics is pretty hard to come by. But I've come to realize after all this time, that these conversations were always from the heart because as an individual we can never stop learning. And it only made me wish that I had listened a little more during my early teenage years when I wanted to sleep and play video games rather than work on the truck or dig a drainage ditch around the house for runoff water. Although, for the most part I did the work (not without complaint) and I'm glad that I did. I'd much rather rely on myself to do the work than pay someone else an arm and a leg to do it for me. Saving money and learning new trades whenever you can, another one of dad's life lessons.


Then there was my dad, the coach on the t-ball team and all the way through little league. Even throwing the ball in the front yard with me when I met him in the driveway with a glove the minute he got home from work every day. My biggest fan, next to my mom of course, at each of my sporting events from baseball to basketball and all the way down to my two years of tennis. Finding whatever chance he could to be at every one of my games, even when he was dog-tired from working the graveyard shift at the plant. Speaking of being dog-tired, he still found a way to take me hunting and fishing and to teach me about the great outdoors every chance he could. Granted I'm sure this great escape was just as much for him as it was finding a hobby that we could bond with. A bond, that allows me to hold the title of "I still caught the bigger fish", which he is reminded of each time he looks above the fireplace at the lake house. Don't worry dad one day you'll get there, but then I'll just catch a bigger one again!

So now here we are, 25 years old, and it's my first Father's Day with a son of my own. And although I was scared to death when I found out I would soon be a father, I knew I had a great teacher to fall back on when I needed help. Not to mention, Mason is going to have one heck of a time fishing and hunting with his PawPaw. He'll also get to learn all those same life lessons I learned growing up, twice over, since I'll be reiterating what PawPaw teaches him. In Mason's two short months he's already grown so much and learned so many new things. I hope that one day he has the same love for sports and the outdoors that I do, but regardless I hope he is able to find and do whatever makes him happy. I know that being there and putting forth the effort is the most important part of being a dad and my solemn swear is to always give him 110%.



So for my first Father's Day, instead of celebrating myself, I want to say thanks to my dad for all of the sacrifices he made for me and all the time he spent making sure I was ready for this day!

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